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2015 New Year’s Resolutions: How can getting my hearing tested make 2015 a better year for me?

If you want to make a New Year’s resolution that will really boost your life and well-being throughout all of 2015, then get your hearing tested.

Addressing hearing loss can add to quality of life in many ways. Here’s a short-list of what getting a hearing test and using professionally fitted hearing aids, if recommended by a hearing care professional, may do for you:

  • Strengthen ties with family and friends. Healthy relationships rest largely on good communication. In one BHI study, more than half the respondents said using hearing aids improved their relationships at home, their social lives, and their ability to join in groups. Many even saw improvements in their romance.
  • Raise your spirits. People with untreated hearing loss often feel angry, frustrated, anxious, isolated, and depressed. But research shows that when they use hearing aids, many become more socially engaged, feel a greater sense of safety and independence, and see a general improvement in their overall quality of life.
  • Lead you to feel better about yourself. An important perk of using hearing aids can be enhanced emotional well-being. Research shows that when people with hearing loss use hearing aids, many feel more in control of their lives and less self-critical. One BHI study found that the majority of people with mild and severe hearing loss felt better about themselves and life overall as a result of using hearing aids.
  • Keep your mind sharp. Studies out of Johns Hopkins linked hearing loss with accelerated cognitive decline in older adults and found that seniors with hearing loss are significantly more likely to develop dementia over time. BHI studies found that many people with hearing loss report improvements in their cognitive skills with the use of hearing aids.
  • Unleash your earning potential. Hearing your best at work helps you do your best. One study found that using hearing aids reduced the risk of income loss by 90 to 100 percent for those with milder hearing loss, and from 65 to 77 percent for those with severe to moderate hearing loss. And people with hearing loss who use hearing aids are more likely to be employed than their peers who don’t.

So go ahead. Click here to take a free, quick, and confidential online hearing check to determine if you need a comprehensive hearing test by a hearing healthcare professional. And let us be the first to congratulate you on your motivation and determination. You’ve taken the first step on the road to better hearing and to securing a better quality of life for yourself in 2015. 

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Other Questions & Answers Below:

How do I know if I have a hearing loss?

The signs of hearing loss can be subtle and emerge slowly, or they can be significant and come on suddenly. Either way, there are common indications. You should suspect hearing loss if you experience any of the signs below. You might have hearing loss if you…

Socially:

  • Require frequent repetition;
  • Have difficulty following conversations involving more than two people;
  • Think that other people sound muffled or like they're mumbling;
  • Have difficulty hearing in noisy situations, like conferences, restaurants, malls, or crowded meeting rooms;
  • Have trouble hearing children and women;
  • Have your TV or radio turned up to a high volume;
  • Answer or respond inappropriately in conversations;
  • Have ringing in your ears; and/or
  • Read lips or more intently watch people's faces when they speak with you.

Emotionally:

  • Feel stressed out from straining to hear what others are saying;
  • Feel annoyed at other people because you can't hear or understand them;
  • Feel embarrassed to meet new people or from misunderstanding what others are saying;
  • Feel nervous about trying to hear and understand; and/or
  • Withdraw from social situations that you once enjoyed because of difficulty hearing.

Medically:

  • Have a family history of hearing loss;
  • Take medications that can harm the hearing system (ototoxic drugs);
  • Have diabetes, heart, circulation or thyroid problems;
  • Have been exposed to very loud sounds over a long period or single exposure to explosive noise.